Design West

Changing the environment instead of optimizing chip design

By Lou Covey, Editorial Director A few weeks ago we reported on a new data center environment that virtually eliminated heat in a data-processing environment.  We decided to talk to a few companies in the chip world about the potential this development has for chip design and the most comprehensive prediction came from Ian Ferguson, vice president of segment marketing for ARM Holdings.  When considering the potential, Ferguson saw almost unlimited possibilities for advancing data processing.  Here's the interview:

Cool stuff you might have missed at Design West, 2013

By Lou CoveyEditorial Director

Every year I go to Design West in San Jose to look for the cool geeky products and displays that you aren't "officially" supposed to be there to check out, because you're supposed to be doing work related research.  This year, it was either a little tougher to find this information or their just wasn't as much, but I found three off-the-beaten track exhibits that you might have missed.  They included an android-based streaming media device that could be used to bypass the movie service in hotels; a device that you can use as a low-cost, DIY car locator (take that Lo Jack); and an honest-to-gosh Enigma Machine from World War II.  Check it out.

[subscribe2]

 

 

Icon Labs addresses the security of the Internet of things

Embedded security was one of the many different tracks offered at the 2012 Design West Conference in San Jose bringing forth a wide variety of companies focused on securing the Internet of things.  One of the more unusual and possibly unique companies was Icon Labs that provides embedded firewalls, protection from the Black Hat world directly on your mobile devices, as well as the embedded internet in general.  New Tech Press sat down with Icon's president, Alan Grau, to find out more about this approach to data security.

Automating embedded software testing with Electric Cloud

The 2012 UBM Survey showed that, for the first time, QA engineers are becoming a significant portion of embedded software teams, and there is less concern about the quality of debugging tools for those teams,  However, the size of those teams is, in general, dropping and concern for tool quality is still number one, all of which makes hitting schedules on time the greatest challenge for those teams. According to Dax Harfang at Electric Cloud, those pressures are even greater in hardware-centric companies who would rather not make a large investment in software QA, especially smaller companies that may be using resources around the world.  Farhang stated that "homegrown" approaches are hard to manage, can be very slow, and often lack documentation that a distributed team can access.  "Development teams need to address "back end" software production processes to save time, improve product quality and deliver software to market faster."  New Tech Press talked with Harfang about meeting automating embedded test at the 2012 Design West Conference in San Jose.